Thoughts Chart Our Course

Since every action is first a thought, then we can intentionally direct our actions through our thoughts. Intentional means done on purpose or deliberate. We can not accurately say that someone or some circumstance made us do something.

Our actions are of our own making. They come from what we dwell on through our mental dialogue. A negative dialogue comes from our heart’s core belief which comes from our past experiences. 

Psalm 15:2 encourages us to speak truth in our heart. We gain our truth from God’s word. Colossians 3:16 says, “Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom, teaching and admonishing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing with grace in your hearts to the Lord.”

Psalm 104:34 says, “May my meditation be sweet to Him; I will be glad in the Lord.” In Psalm 19:14 David was praying. Let our words echo his. It says, “Let the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart be acceptable in Your sight, O Lord, my strength and my Redeemer.”

Our thoughts can either bring mental fatigue or mental clarity and strength. A negative dialogue causes us to spiral down emotionally. A righteous dialogue builds up our faith and stabilizes our walk with the Lord.

A negative dialogue goes against our design. It brings confusion to our brain. A negative person has not guarded their heart. Proverbs 4:23 says, “Keep your heart with all diligence, for out of it spring the issues of life.”

Let’s look at what happens when we are not diligent. In Proverbs 24:330-34 we read a short discourse of a man who lacked diligence. Consider this passage as a picture into his heart.

Verse 30-31 says, “I went by the field of the lazy man, and by the vineyard of the man devoid of understanding; and there it was all overgrown with thorns; its surface was covered with nettles; its stone wall was broken down.”

We have to ask ourselves: is my heart full of thorns? Mark 4:19 described the result of not being diligent to root out thorns. It says, “And the cares of this world, the deceitfulness of riches, and the desires for other things entering in choke the word, and it becomes unfruitful.”

A negative person is not content. They see everything in their life through a cloudy lens. They are centered on self and cannot see beyond their own needs. The word of God does not occupy their mind. Other things have entered and choked it.

There was a back field at my old house that was full of star thistle. It was very proficient at sowing weed seeds. If I tried to pull one up, I had to use gloves because the needles were prickly. In Proverbs 24:31 it said that the ground was covered with nettles. A negative person is prickly.

Peter encouraged his readers to diligently add to their faith. He gave a list of things to add. Then in verse 8 he wrote, “For if these things are yours and abound, you will be neither barren nor unfruitful in the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ.”

Verse 9 is very insightful regarding our hearts. It says, “For he who lacks these things is shortsighted, even to blindness, and has forgotten that he was cleansed from his old sins.”

A negative person’s heart is barren. It is overgrown with thorns and nettles, and its protective hedge of God’s word is broken down. How then do they course correct? First by acknowledging that they have been negligent. They have failed to bring in God’s word to pull out the overgrowth of weeds.

God’s word is a good seed that will flourish in any heart with fertile soil. They will bear much fruit for the glory of the Lord. Their speech will impart grace, and will encourage all who hear their words. Let us be diligent to keep our heart so that our meditation is sweet to the Lord who alone hears our thoughts.

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